• Users Online: 186
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 18-21

Acral subcorneal hematoma: Additional dermoscopic findings differentiating it from acral melanocytic lesions


1 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Armed Forces Hospitals, Southern Region, Khamis Mushait, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Armed Forces Hospitals, Southern Region, Khamis Mushait, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ahmed H Nassar
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, El-Geish Street, Tanta 31111, Egypt; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Armed Forces Hospitals - Southern Region, Khamis Mushait, Saudi Arabia

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdds.jdds_63_19

Get Permissions

Background: Acral subcorneal hematoma (ASH) is a dark-colored skin lesion of the palms and/or soles due to bleeding. ASH may be difficult to be clinically differentiated from acral melanocytic lesions, resulting in unnecessary biopsies. Few researches reported the importance of dermoscopy in differentiating ASH from acral melanocytic lesions. Purpose: This study aims at reporting the dermoscopic features in a series of ASH to facilitate precise diagnosis and to avoid performing unnecessary surgical techniques. Methods: Eighteen patients with ASH were studied. Dermoscopic images were obtained using a handheld dermoscope and a dermoscope-adopted phone camera. Paring test was performed on all lesions. Results: The preliminary diagnoses of the lesions were ASH in 55.6%, acral melanocytic nevi in 33.3%, and acral lentiginous melanoma in the remaining 11.1%. Dermoscopically, the lesion colors were red-black in 44.4%, black in 27.8%, and brown in the remaining 27.8%. The pigmentation patterns were homogeneous (structureless) in 55.6%, parallel ridge in 27.8%, and negative pseudonetwork in the remaining 16.6%. Over 44% of the lesions had red and/or brown globular satellites. Peripheral red lines with/without radial extensions were noticed around ASH in 55.6%. Paring led to complete removal of pigmentation in all ASH (100%), with the appearance of post-paring blood-tinged serum in 55.6%. No skin biopsies were performed. Conclusion: Although there is clinical similarity between ASH and acral melanocytic lesions, dermoscopy and paring test can facilitate a precise diagnosis and markedly decrease the need for unnecessary invasive procedures.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed358    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded52    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal